------------------------- U of MN Extension ServiceMI-07375
1999

Western Flower Thrips Feeding Scars and Tospovirus Lesions on Petunia Indicator Plants

Michael J. McDonough,
Graduate Student Department of Horticulture
Daniel Gerace,
Research Fellow Department of Entomology
Mark E. Ascerno,
Extension Entomologist and Department Head Department of Entomology


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  2006  Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved.



Image 1

Lesions on petunia leaves caused by the feeding of western flower thrips (WFT).

  • The white lesions on the right leaf are caused by WFT that are not carrying the tospovirus.
  • The dark lesions on the left leaf are caused by WFT that are carrying the tospovirus.
Image 2

A closer look at a tospovirus lesion as it first appears on the petunia leaf.

Image 3

An older lesion on a petunia leaf. As the lesion ages, its center changes from black to tan.

From, Robb, K. L., C. Casey, A. Whitfield, and L. Campbell. 1998. A new weapon to fight INSV and TSVW. Grower Talks 61(12): 63-73. Photographs by Jack Kelly Clark; used with permission.
Table 1. Host plants for tospoviruses TSWV and INSV listed by greenhouse crop type.
  TSWV INSV
Bedding Plants
Begonia + +
Blue daisy +  
Browallia   +
Caladium   +
Celosia   +
Coleus   +
Dahlia + +
Dusty miller   +
Eggplant + +
Fuschia +  
Gazania + +
Geranium + +
Gomphrena   +
Impatiens + +
Lobelia + +
Maltese cross   +
Marigold   +
Moss rose + +
Nasturtium   +
New Guinea Impatiens   +
Petunia + +
Phlox   +
Salvia + +
Sea lavender +  
Star of Bethlehem +  
Stock   +
Strawflower + +
Swan River daisy    
Verbena   +
Zinnia   +
Foliage plants
Arrowhead vine   +
Bird's Nest fern    
Chinese evergreen + +
Cordyline + +
Dieffenbachia +  
Dracaena + +
Japanese aralia +  
Kalanchoe + +
Maranta + +
Oleander +  
Pedilanthus   +
Piggyback plant   +
Pothos   +
Rubber tree + +
Schefflera   +
Swedish Ivy   +
Tradescantia   +
  TSWV INSV
Weeping fig +  
Zebra plant   +
Non-Ornamentals
Broadbean +  
Celery +  
Endive +  
Garden bean +  
Lettuce +  
Pepper + +
Spinach + +
Tarragon   +
Tomato + +
African violet + +
Alstromeria + +
Amazon lily   +
Amaryllis + +
Anemone   +
Anthurium + +
Ardisia + +
Asiatic lily + +
Bromelia +  
Calceolaria   +
Calla lily +  
Chrysanthemum + +
Clivia +  
Cyclamen + +
Eucharis +  
Exacum   +
Florist's cineraria +  
Gardenia + +
Gerbera + +
Gladiola + +
Gloxinia + +
Hoya   +
Hydrangea + +
Lantana +  
Lipstick plant   +
Lisianthus + +
Mother of thousands   +
Oncidium +  
Oxalis   +
Peace lily +  
Peperomia + +
Phalaenopsis +  
Primula + +
Rain daisy +  
Ranunculus + +
  TSWV INSV
Rhododendron +  
Ruscus   +
Schizanthus + +
Snapdragon   +
Statice +  
Stephanotis + +
Streptocarpus + +
Thanksgiving cactus   +
Perennials
Ajuga   +
Aster +  
Barberry   +
Bee balm   +
Bishop's weed   +
Black-eyed susan   +
Campanula   +
Catnip   +
Columnea + +
Delphinium   +
English daisy   +
Forget-me-not   +
Foxglove   +
Gaillardia +  
Gentian   +
Hosta   +
Osteospermum +  
Pentstemon   +
Peony   +
Physostegia   +
Polemonium   +
Poppy   +
Red Valerian + +
Sedum   +
Shasta daisy   +
Turtlehead   +
Veronica   +
Vinca + +
Weeds
Bittercress   +
Chickweed   +
Dandelion +  
Field bindweed +  
Galinsoga   +
Horseweed +  
Jewelweed   +
Lamb's quarters +


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