U of MN Extension ServiceFO-06953
1997

College of Agricultural, Food,
and Environmental Sciences


Insect Pests of Roses

Kevin Stroom, Jody Fetzer, and Vera Krischik


Roses are very popular landscape plants grown for their beauty. Roses are susceptible to several insects and diseases which reduce flower growth and quality as well as frustrate rose gardeners. In general, these insects do not kill the plant, but may stunt or kill parts, affect flowering, or cause aesthetic damage. Learning the proper care of roses and management of pest problems increases your success in growing a beautiful rose bush.


Photo 1: Healthy rose blossoms.
Plant Health Care (PHC) is a strategy for keeping plants stress free by considering factors related to growing and maintaining the plant. An important result of PHC is that roses in healthy condition are less impacted by insects than plants under stress. Start by selecting a suitable cultivar and site. Remember some rose cultivars and species are more resistant to disease. For suggestions on disease-resistant shrub roses, refer to the University of Minnesota Extension Service publication Selecting Hardy Roses for Northern Climates, FO-6750, and Roses for the North, MR-6594.

Next, select a proper site. Make sure that soil and light requirements are met and that the roses are planted at the correct depth. After planting, appropriate long-term maintenance is important. Follow the instructions found on the tag for water and fertility requirements, and provide a mulch around the base of the plants. See Extension publication Culture of Garden Roses, FS-1105, for more information on cultivation.

Management of insects and diseases is called Integrated Pest Management (IPM). IPM is a decision-making process which includes scouting, damage-threshold decisions, control options, and timing of insecticide application. IPM practices reduce non-target effects on beneficial insects and permit control decisions based on pest species and the most vulnerable stage in its life history.



IPM for insect pets of roses
Defoliators/leaf feeders
Defoliators/leaf feeders
Piercing/sucking feeders
Piercing/sucking feeders
Bud/shoot feeders
Bud/shoot feeders
Gall makers
Gall makers
Stem borers
Stem borers

References

This publication serves as a companion to the slide set, CUES for Insect Identification on Roses, SS-6954.

 1997  Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved.

Acknowledgements

Special thanks to Robert Wawrzynski and Bob Mugaas for reviewing the manuscript and providing helpful comments. Thanks to John Davidson, University of Maryland, for permission to use his slides. Also, thanks to Dave Hansen and Bob Mugaas, University of Minnesota Extension Service; Kathy Zuzek, University of Minnesota, for the use of slides.

Produced by Communication and Educational Technology Services, University of Minnesota Extension Service.

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, this material is available in alternative formats upon request. Please contact your University of Minnesota county extension office or, outside of Minnesota, contact the Distribution Center at (612) 625-8173.

The University of Minnesota Extension Service is committed to the policy that all persons shall have equal access to its programs, facilities, and employment without regard to race, color, creed, religion, national origin, sex, age, marital status, disability, public assistance status, veteran status, or sexual orientation.

The information given in this publication is for educational purposes only. Reference to commercial products or trade names is made with the understanding that no discrimination is intended and no endorsement by the University of Minnesota Extension Service is implied.